The Main Drive Behind Forest Fires

forest-fireTemperatures are rising and forest fires, already larger and more frequent than the historical norm, are projected to increase dramatically with anthropogenic warming.

That’s the general consensus among scientists studying the relationship between fire activity and climate change in the Sierra Nevada. But a study released last week found an influence on past fire activity even greater than climate: human beings.

Since 1600, the way humans have used land in the Sierra has had more effect on fire behavior than climate change, said Valerie Trouet, associate professor of dendrochronology at the University of Arizona and lead coauthor of the study, published November 14 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

To read more, click here.

Texas Emerging Communities

Many Texas communities are growing at an astounding rate. Small communities face unique obstacles during times of accelerated urbanization; community leaders need planning tools and technical support systems to help them prepare for high velocity growth before it happens – not after. To address this, the Texas A&M Forest Service is working with multiple partners on a state-wide project to educate community leaders and staff to proactively manage high velocity growth to improve quality of life by the conservation, protection, and enhancement of their natural resources. The project addresses six main focus areas: sustainable planning, community forestry, environmental health, wildfire protection, water conservation, and emergency management. The project website includes information about each of these focus areas and includes case studies, municipal tree ordinances, tree preservation ordinances, related web resources, how-to guides, and other informational resources.

To learn more visit: http://www.texasemergingcommunities.org/