Kids Who Play More Outdoors May be Less Likely to Have Problems with Peers

peer-problem Kids who spend more time outdoors seem to gain a boost in their peer relations, per a new report from Statistics Canada. In September, the agency released a report on outdoor time, physical activity and sedentary time and health indicators of Canadians aged 7 to 14.

Canadian guidelines suggest that kids between 5 and 17 years old get at least 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity per day. Only 9 percent of children do. (The rule of thumb is if you’re able to carry on a conversation easily then you’re not working hard enough.)

Each additional hour spent outdoors was associated with:

  • 7 more minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity.
  • 762 more steps.
  • 13 fewer minutes of sedentary time.

Additionally, children reporting more time outdoors were less likely to have peer relationship problems compared with those who spent less time outside, Mark Tremblay of the Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and his team said in Health Reports.

To read the full article, click here.

Outdoor Learning Project Reveals Children More Motivated to Learn When Outside

outdoor-learningChildren from 125 schools across the South West of England are happier, healthier and more motivated to learn thanks to a new project commissioned by Natural England that has turned the outdoors into a classroom and helped schools transform ways of teaching.

The findings have been released today by the Natural Connections Demonstration project, a 4-year initiative to help school children – particularly those from disadvantaged areas – experience the benefits of the natural environment by empowering teachers to use the outdoors to support everyday learning.

The project, which is funded by Natural England, Defra and Historic England and delivered by Plymouth University, is the largest project of its kind in England and has already helped more than 40,000 primary and secondary school pupils get out of their classrooms and into the outdoors – whether that’s a math lesson in a local park or drama out on the school field.

To read the full article, click here.

How to Raise an Environmentalist

loc_environmentalistThis article discusses how we can encourage kids to care more and take action to protect our environment. Social science research indicates that motivating people to take action requires promoting compassionate concern for the world rather than just stating facts and making disastrous predictions about the future world. Research is suggesting that the desire to conserve is linked to our connection to nature – the degree to which we enjoy spending time in nature. Early exposure to nature increases the likelihood that people will care about the environment once they are adults.

While researchers are still trying to figure out why early exposure to nature increases environmental concern, they do know that emotional engagement is crucial in this process. Maintaining mindful behavior when going into a natural setting leads to a more connectedness with nature and the ability to empathize with the creatures and environment.  The first step in the right direction is to get more children outside, playing, and receiving all the benefits nature has to give.

To read the full article, click here.

Window Views to Green Landscapes Help High Schoolers Recover from Attention Fatigue and Stress

green_view
coppercountryexplorer.com
In a recent study, students that were in classrooms with views to green space were better able to pay attention and recover from stressful events than students in classrooms that had views of buildings or other man-made structures, or no windows at all

Ninety-four high school students from five high schools participated in this study. Student participants were randomly assigned to  either a classroom with no windows, a classroom with windows that opened to a built space, and a classroom with windows that opened to a green space. Participants engaged in typical classroom activities followed by a break in the classroom to which they were assigned. The researchers studied stress levels with EKG readings, blood volume pulse, and body temperature.  Other tests measured the students’ attention fatigue and perceived stress levels.

Results demonstrate that classroom views to green landscapes cause significantly better performance on tests of attention and increase student’s recovery from stressful experiences.

To read the full article, click here.

Can Urban Forest Settings Positively Influence Children with Autism?

In late July, autism_greenspaceUSDA Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the four recipients of the 2016 USDA Forest Service’s National Urban and Community Forestry Challenge grants. One of the recipients, Georgia State University (GSU) and several partners, will investigate the impact of natural environments such as urban and community forests on symptom expression in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

Brian Barger, research assistant professor at GSU, is principal investigator for the grant, with collaborators from other universities, nongovernmental agencies, and the Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS). Cassandra Johnson Gaither, project leader of the SRS Integrating Human and Natural Systems unit based in Athens, Georgia, and Annie Hermansen-Baez, SRS science delivery and Kids in the Wood coordinator in the same unit, will provide their expertise in assessment and science delivery.

“Research results showing the positive effects of managed natural environments such as urban parks and forests on human general and mental health have grown exponentially over the last decade,” said Barger. “Yet no studies to date have explored the effects of these environments on the expression of core and associated symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorders.”

To read the full article in SRS’s CompassLive, click here.

Health Benefits of Nature

benefits_of_natureSpending time in nature can benefit humans in more ways than one. Researchers are building a body of evidence that proves that nature can greatly improve our short and long term mental and physical health.

For example, children diagnosed with ADD/ADHD can increase their concentration with as little as a 20 minute walk in a natural setting.  Adults with depression can decrease their symptoms of depression with a short period of time in nature. These are just two of the many benefits nature can have for our health.

To see the hundreds of research studies, news articles, and case studies about the benefits of nature for children and adults, click here.

 

Stanford Study Measures the Health Benefits of Nature Walks

bridgeA growing body of evidence supports the idea that spending time in nature has positive impacts on human physical and mental health. As a result, scientists are beginning to conduct research that addresses the more specific questions of just exactly how nature is beneficial and they are providing quantifiable results.

In a recent study by Stanford, researchers were able to pinpoint a neural response that resulted from time spent in nature. Study participants walked in either a high-traffic urban setting or in a natural area for 90 minutes. Participants that walked in natural areas showed a decrease in activity in the region of the brain associated with a key factor causing depression. This suggests that making time for nature outings might be helpful in addressing a range of mental health disorders, particularly for those living in city settings.

To read the full article click here.  

Bonnie Appleton Memorial Fund

ba2Join MAC-ISA and Trees Virginia in a lasting tribute to Bonnie Appleton’s contributions to horticulture and arboriculture education and research. The Bonnie Appleton Memorial Fund was recently established at the TREE Fund to honor Dr. Appleton.  The fund will be used to sponsor scholarships to help support undergraduate students continuing in her footsteps to benefit the green industry.  Barbara White (VDOF) remembers Bonnie Appleton as “an inspiring person to her students and to the industries that she worked with.  Her research bridged many fields from horticulture and arboriculture to nursery and landscape management, landscape design and utility arboriculture… we miss her passion and advocacy for horticulture and arboriculture education and research.”

Click here to donate directly, on-line at TREE Fund.

U&CF Management and Research

A recurring theme (of interest from a technology transfer point of view) at the 2013 Partners in Community Forestry Conference this week in Pittsburgh was the need for data to support research.  Beth Larry, USDA FS Urban Research, spoke of this need at the closing session when she outlined the connection between partners, research and the process:

  • research direction (from the field)
  • research design
  • the need for data (from a range of sources)
  • science delivery to “bridge science & practice” (back to the field)

At concurrent sessions that morning, Lara Roman, USDA FS Research Ecologist, introduced the national network for tree growth & mortality (www.urbantreegrowth.org).  Following Lara was Theresa Crimmins, Nat’l Outreach Director for the National Phenology Network with a presentation on Nature’s Notebook.  This national database records life stages (e.g. tree leafout, blossoms, seed development, fall color) of plants (and animals) and the information has research and practical applications of relevance to local volunteer tree groups, and their community U&CF programs.  She highlighted recent work with Casey Trees in Washington, DC.

Earlier in the week Theresa made a similar presentation to the Society of Municipal Arborists and encouraged municipal and other professional arborists & urban foresters to get involved and involve their communities.

Visit these organizations and join thousands of professionals and volunteers throughout the nation that are contributing to long-term datasets to support current & future research.

Connecting Kids to the Hogtown Creek Watershed in Gainesville, Florida

mary__kids_in_woodsInterfaceSouth and local partners, including the University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Alachua County School District, the Gainesville Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs, and Alachua County Environmental Protection Department, received funding through this year’s Forest Service More Kids in the Woods (MKIW) cost share funding opportunity. The MKIW program supports activities and programs designed to spark curiosity about nature and promote learning through applications of science, technology, engineering and mathematics principles.

Project partners will collaborate with Westwood middle school science teachers to conduct outdoor science learning activities and service learning projects within the nearby Hogtown Creek Watershed in Gainesville, FL. Partners will also organize a school camp out, participate in career day events and science fairs, and conduct a train-the-teacher workshop on outdoor learning concepts and techniques. Project successes, materials and information will be shared locally, regionally and nationally through our combined partner networks.

To learn more about the Forest Service’s More Kids in the Woods program and 2013 cost share funding recipients visit: 

www.fs.usda.gov/main/conservationeducation/about/education-themes/kids-in-woods  

www.fs.fed.us/news/2013/releases/05/more-kids-outdoors.shtml